Aquarium Rotifers

Aquarium Rotifers

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Aquarium rotifer
Aquarium Rotifer

Aquarium rotifers are small animals that contain both fresh and saltwater species.  They are among the smallest members of the Metazoa — that group of multicellular animals which includes humans, and whose bodies are organized into systems of organs.  Most rotifers are about 0.5mm in length or less, and their bodies have a total of around a thousand cells. Their organ systems are a greatly simplified version of the organ systems found in the bodies of the higher animals.

A typical aquarium rotifers might have a brain of perhaps fifteen cells with associated nerves and ganglia, a stomach of much the same number, an excretory system of only a dozen or so cells, and a similarly fundamental reproductive system.  Despite their complexity, many rotifers are much smaller than common single-celled organisms whose world they share.

Aquarium Rotifer in Motion
Aquarium Rotifer in Motion

Their most distinctive feature is the corona — usually in the form of two lobes surrounded by beating cilia, which give a vivid impression of rapidly rotating wheels. The current created by the corona brings food particles to the mouth, and when the rotifer releases the grip of its foot, they act as twin propellers, transporting the rotifer rapidly from one place to another.

Aquarium rotifers have at least two other remarkable qualities. Firstly, they are able to survive long periods — even perhaps hundreds of years — in a dried or frozen state, and will resume normal behaviour when rehydrated or thawed.
Secondly, they exhibit what biologists call cell constancy — they grow in size not by cell division, but by increase in the size of the cells which they already have.  A rotifer ends its life with the same number of cell nuclei with which it was born!

Ecologically speaking, they play an important contributory role in the natural water purification process.  The diet of aquarium rotifers also consists of dead or decomposing organic materials, as well as unicellular algae and other phytoplankton. Such feeding habits make some rotifers primary consumers. Aquarium rotifers are in turn prey to carnivorous secondary consumers, including shrimp and crabs.

Aquarium Rotifers for Sale

Saltwater Aquarium rotifers for Sale
Saltwater Aquarium Rotifers for Sale

Faremax Trading Co.  AT Rotifer Delight – Live Aquarium rotifers (10 oz)

Food for Copepods, Aquarium rotifers (zooplankton), Soft Corals, Clams, and other Filter Feeders

Super Nutritious. No Preservatives or Additives .Harvested Daily to Insure Freshness

Free Priority Mail Shipping Which Rotifers Do You Stock? We stock (Brachionus plicatilis) which is the “L” strain which range in size from 150-360 microns. Unlike brine shrimp or pods, they cannot be easily seen with the naked eye. With the rotifers in a clear container and the water perfectly still, shine a flash light to the side of the container. The rotifers should be visible as tiny specks swimming around when viewed from the surface of the water. Storage DO NOT FREEZE! Keep refrigerated for up to 7 days between 34° – 39°F (1 – 4°C). After 7 days majority of your rotifers will be dead.

Aquarium Microfauna Aquarium rotifers
Coral Reefing Aquarium Rotifers

Coral Reefing Products, LLC – 8 oz. Live Marine Aquarium Rotifers

LIVE SALTWATER PRODUCT, reproduces readily in reef aquariums

High in protein and crude fat, aids in rapid growth!

Excellent detritivores, Aquarium rotifers feed on excess waste in aquarium.   Feeds hard corals, young fish and macro inverts

AQUACULTURE NURSERY FARMS  – Live Aquarium Rotifers Saltwater 16oz. High density

High density Marine Rotifers L Type.  Packed with Dense Phytopreme Algae 6 types.  Start your own Zooplankton Culture at home. Comes with instructions.

Get some of our Roti-Food to feed your aquarium rotifer culture.  Free Shipping. 16oz Size bag of rotifers.

Aquarium Rotifers for Sale
Aquarium Rotifers for Sale

Why buy live aquarium rotifers on line? Take a look at the density of rotifers you get with these cultures in the pics. Easy and convenient way to get fresh plankton delivered to your door, food for fish like clownfish larvae, Seahorse fry and rearing many other type of fish fry. High Density Culture. Take a look at the pictures to see amount that we pack in these saltwater rotifers. SIZE: 150 to 300um MEDIUM: Shipped in a dense solution of phytoplankton called Phytopreme Live, comprised of Tetraselmis, Nannochloropsis, Isochrysis, Pavlova, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Synechococcus .. (This is the food that we feed our Zooplankton cultures here at the nursery). FACTS: This aquarium rotifer strain is one of the most important live feed items in the food chain. It is used all over the world in production nurseries, fish and invertebrate farms and utilized for culturing and raising saltwater animals such as corals, vertebrate and invertebrate larvae of all kinds of species, fish and shrimp, crustaceans, etc. BENEFITS: Using aquarium rotifers as live food for home aquariums will provide a very necessary link in the food chain in your miniature ecosystem at home that we call aquariums.

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Aquarium rotifers have bilateral symmetry and a variety of different shapes. The body of a rotifer is divided into a head, trunk, and foot, and is typically somewhat cylindrical. There is a well-developed cuticle which may be thick and rigid, giving the animal a box-like shape, or flexible, giving the animal a worm-like shape.  Rigid cuticles are often composed of multiple plates, and may bear spines, ridges, or other ornamentation.

The most distinctive feature of rotifers is the presence of a ciliated structure, called the corona, on the head. In the more primitive species, this forms a simple ring of cilia around the mouth from which an additional band of cilia stretches over the back of the head. In the great majority of rotifers, however, this has evolved into a more complex structure.

Modifications to the basic plan of the corona include alteration of the cilia into bristles or large tufts, and either expansion or loss of the ciliated band around the head. In genera such as the corona is modified to form a funnel surrounding the mouth. In some aquarium rotifers this plan is further modified, with the upper band splitting into two rotating wheels, raised up on a pedestal projecting from the upper surface of the head.

The trunk forms the major part of the body, and encloses most of the internal organs. The foot projects from the rear of the trunk, and is usually much narrower, giving the appearance of a tail. The cuticle over the foot often forms rings, making it appear segmented, although the internal structure is uniform. Many rotifers can retract the foot partially or wholly into the trunk.  In many free-swimming species, the foot as a whole is reduced in size, and may even be absent.

Aquarium rotifers eat particulate organic detritus, dead bacteria, algae, and protozoans. They eat particles up to 10 micrometers in size.  Aquarium rotifers contribute to nutrient recycling. For this reason, they are used in fish tanks to help clean the water, to prevent clouds of waste matter. Rotifers affect the species composition of algae in ecosystems through their choice in grazing.

Aquarium rotifers can reproduce sexually or asexually.  The females are always larger than the males. In some species, this is relatively mild, but in others the female may be up to ten times the size of the male. In some species, males may be present only at certain times of the year, or absent altogether.

Males do not usually have a functional digestive system, and are therefore short-lived, often being fertile at birth. They have a single testicle and a vestigial digestive system, which lacks an anus.

Fertilization is internal. The male either inserts his penis into the female’s cloaca or uses it to penetrate her skin, injecting the sperm into the body cavity. The egg secretes a shell, and is attached either to the substratum, nearby plants, or the female’s own body. A few species retain the eggs inside their body until they hatch.

Most species of aquarium rotifers hatch as miniature versions of the adult.  Females grow rapidly, reaching their adult size within a few days, while males typically do not grow in size at all.  The life span of females varies from two days to about three weeks.

Aquarium Rotifers Gallery

Aquarium rotifer
Aquarium Rotifer
Aquarium Rotifers
Aquarium Rotifer
aquarium rotifer 1
Aquarium Rotifer Anatomy
Aquarium rotifer 2
Aquarium Rotifer
Aquarium rotifer 3
Aquarium Rotifer Anatomy
Aquarium rotifer 4
Aquarium Rotifers Mouth
Aquarium rotifer 6
Aquarium Rotifer Anatomy
Aquarium Rotifers
Aquarium Rotifers Electron Microscope
Aquarium Rotifers
Aquarium Rotifer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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